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feminist-space:

via xkcd: http://xkcd.com/1357/
For fuck’s sake people. I see this comic going around and it’s so obviously from xkcd but people still took off the link. Do NOT take off attribution. 

feminist-space:

via xkcd: http://xkcd.com/1357/

For fuck’s sake people. I see this comic going around and it’s so obviously from xkcd but people still took off the link. Do NOT take off attribution. 

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pulitzerfieldnotes:

Violet Clarke is a Métis (of combined aboriginal and European ancestry) woman who lives on a reservation (known as a reserve in Canada) in the town of Anzac, about an hour-and-a-half drive from the mining boom town Fort McMurray.

Though 86 years old, she recalls her childhood in this region vividly. Sitting in the eat-in kitchen of a mobile home that, from the outside, looks ramshackle, she recounted hunting for moose and collecting blueberries in birch bark baskets. They fished in Willow Lake. Her father made only two visits a year to the nearest town, Fort McMurray, where he bartered for supplies like cloth and baking soda.

By some measures, life is better now. She has a cell phone, running water, electricity and a heated home. But she says she was better off then. She says today the moose are gone, scared away by nearby tar sands (also called called oil sands) prospecting, extraction, processing and transport. She says the berries are not safe to eat. Mercury contamination has made Willow lake’s fish inedible. Even her water has to be trucked in now.

Video and text by Dan Grossman. Canada, 2014.

For his upcoming project reporting on Alberta’s oil sands with aerial photographer Alex MacLean. Alberta’s sands are the world’s third largest oil reserve and one of Earth’s largest industrial projects.

Listen to an unedited audio interview with Violet. 

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When the real world meets fiction: ‘The Woman Upstairs’ vs. ‘Fangirl’

ellison-langford:

I enjoy reading books you have to be “in the know” to understand. (Unless I’m not “in the know,” in that case, come down out of your ivory tower) Like when we read The Great Gatsby in high school. Our teacher spent the first day explaining the cultural setting, and subsequent days interjecting explanations of symbolism (daisies are corrupt on the inside, but appear pure on the outside)

F. Scott Fitzgerald LOVED his symbolism.

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From ‘Hark! A Vagrant’ by Kate Beaton

Cultural markers, symbolism, allusions, all those literary secrets can make for a richer reading experience. When prepared to notice and understand them, the fog clears from the world the author has created, and we see it more clearly. But sometimes they also send us looking for meaning that’s not there.

I got to thinking about this while reading two books that make historical timelines and cultural trends a significant part of the work– “The Woman Upstairs” by Claire Messud, and “Fangirl” by Rainbow Rowell. The references to current events in “The Woman Upstairs” were kind of jarring and seemingly unnecessary. On the other hand, while readers unfamiliar with fandoms and slash fanfiction will find much of “Fangirl” incomprehensible, that it draws so heavily from these subcultures is what gives the book life.

Read More

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theuppitynegras:

just think about y’all millions and millions of little dark skinned black girls are going to go to the supermarket with their parents this month and when they’re waiting in line at the check out aisle they’re going to look up and see Lupita Nyong’o being hailed as the most beautiful woman in the world god is amazing

(via hit-it-and-quidditch)

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newageamazon:

gimpnelly:

heterophobicgoat:

stupidandreckless:

NOOOO NO NO NONO FUCK FUCK  FUCKIG CBS IS TELLING WOMEN NOT TO REPORT SEXUAL HARASSMENT BECAUSE IT WILL “DAMAGE THEIR CAREERS” and “HARASSMENT IS AN UNFORTUNATE PART OF CLIMBING THE LADDER” I AM SO ANGRY THEY ARE LITERALLY TURNING SEXUAL HARASSMENT INTO A NORM THIS IS NOT OKAY

This is an actual article and I’m still having a hard time believing it’s real.

That is AWFUL. Please report it when you’re sexually harassed. If not for yourself, to try to protect future victims.

FUCK THIS SHIT.

Look, I can understand circumstances where, yeah, reporting it is difficult and you would choose not to.  There are times when you literally HAVE NO OTHER CHOICE and it sucks, and those assholes are taking advantage of it.  Not every woman can put her source of income at risk like that, and the one thing the article gets right is that the laws DON’T always work, you are NOT guaranteed protection.

Which is why we need to keep fighting for better laws and better enforcement of policies.  Which is why when you CAN report it, you SHOULD and FIGHT against this mindset that it’s just something women have to deal with if we want to sit at the boys table.  Harassment is NOT just an inconvenience, it is dehumanizing, it is upsetting, it is a weapon used against women and it is BEYOND NOT OKAY. 

And of course: why the fuck are you acting like women should have to control whether they report it or not instead of the very basic fact that MEN SHOULD NOT BE DOING THIS?!?!

FUUUUUUUUUCK EVERYTHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIING.

If by “handle it on your own,” you mean I duct tape my harasser inside the copy room with five minutes left on Friday before a long weekend, sure.

(via scarymerry)

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dichotomized:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

dichotomized:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

(via professorbutterscotch)

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peterfromtexas:

Meanwhile in Toronto

peterfromtexas:

Meanwhile in Toronto

(via feminist-space)